The Stemoscope has been specifically designed for STEM education and offers the possibility to listen to heart, breath sounds, and much more. With a nice and sleek design, Stemoscope comes at a very reasonable price, and even if it, not a medically approved digital stethoscope, it allows you to listen to the sounds of life. Specific apps to listen to pets or babies are available to record sounds and ease positioning. Stemoscope is a great gift for teenagers with a medical vocation or even for people willing to listen to their body sounds without having to invest in an FDA-cleared stethoscope. We suspect that the currently develop pro-version will be of great use for telehealth.

Stemoscope by Stemoscope

3.5 stars

Price when reviewed: $79.99

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Stemoscope started as a very successful Kickstarter project. The underlying idea was to develop a digital stethoscope for science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics classes to help students better understand body and nature sounds.

Stemoscope is not a medical device, is not FDA-cleared, and should not be used for medical diagnosis. Its ultimate goal is to discover the sounds of life.

Weighing 1.1 ounces (30g) and with a diameter of 0.4 inches (11mm), stemoscope is just a little bit bigger than one dollar coin. Though it is packed with electronics and offers 16x amplification. The sounds are transmitted to the iOS and Android compatible where they can be recorded.

For Students or nature lovers, the stemoscope will offer the possibility to listen to the heart, lung sounds, pets’ internal organs, and even the fetus’s sounds. It will certainly not replace a fetus doppler, but it offers ways to listen to the world in a completely different way and potentially to vocations.

The company developed specific apps depending on the ultimate use of the stemoscope, such as Babystemo or Petstemo. The apps are simple but easy to use and will record the transmitted sound and position the device for optimal listening properly. The heart rate will also be picked up and displayed.

With a USB rechargeable of 50 mAh, it offers five hours of continuous use. Built in zinc alloy and ABS plastic, it will sustain the rigor of time. As an educational tool, the Stemoscope offers what it promises. Do not compare it to “real” digital stethoscopes such as the 3M Littman Core stethoscope. It will pick and amplify sound without noise reduction algorithms but will not process them to reduce the background or friction noises.

Encouraged by the success of the Stemoscope, the company is now developing a pro-medical version that is currently part of an Indiegogo campaign. The estimated shipping date is June 1, and this new model will include noise canceling. As of February 26, the Stemoscope Pro has already received more than $142,000 from 685 backers.